Annual Purimspiel

Each Spring, Gail Rose, Debbie Costa, and Pam Scheer are joined by a cast of 30 crazy characters for the Annual Purimspiel to retell the Biblical story of Queen Esther and how she saved her people. Each year features a different theme for the Purimspiel. Past themes include Star Wars, Disney, Broadway, and Groovy 70s, to name a few. “Auditions” are held at the first rehearsal and everyone gets a part. For more information, or to be included in upcoming “audition” notices, contact Gail Rose at
grose@tbsohio.org or call the Temple office at (614) 855-4882.

+1.614.855.4882

5089 Johnstown Rd New Albany OH 43054 US

WORSHIP: MUSIC AT TEMPLE BETH SHALOM

​​Shabband

On the third Friday of each month, Temple Beth Shalom celebrates “Shabbat Chai,” a toe-tapping, lively musical event featuring Shabband, a changeable group of Jewish musicians who enjoy jamming and leading Erev Shabbat services together. Shabband members include Klezmer violinist Arkadiy Gips, a well-known local musician who appeared with Madonna during her “Sticky and Sweet” World Tour, as well as vocalists Rabbi Howard Apothaker, Gail Rose, Leah Apothaker, Connie Hirsh, and Isaac Wurmbrand, vocalists and guitarists Rabbi Benjy Bar-Lev, Angelo Dunlap and Marc Rossio, mandolin player Roger Benjamin, percussionist Scott Roth, upright bassist Nick Ciranni, and flutist Cheri Papier. They often are accompanied by pianists Scot Ashton, Carol Fey, Merry Pruitt, or Aaron Abromowitz. For information about participating with Shabband, contact Rabbi Bar-Lev at rabbibenjy@tbsohio.org, or call the Temple office at (614) 855-4882.

The Sharyonim Choir

Temple Beth Shalom is proud to have an adult choir, Sharyonim, which sings during High Holy Day services, for the popular Veterans Shabbat in November, and during various other Erev Shabbat services throughout the year. The Sharyonim also hosts at least one additional guest choir for a special performance in the Spring.

Sharyonim to Begin Rehearsals for High Holy Days
Sharyonim, led by Debbi Costa and Gail Rose, will begin rehearsing music for the High Holy Days on Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2015. The first gathering will begin at 6:30 pm with a Pizza with salad dinner for members to catch up with one another; rehearsal will be held that evening from 7:30 to 9 pm. Please RSVP for dinner to the Temple office at
rsvp@tbsohio.org.

Additional rehearsals will be held on Tuesdays, from 7:30 to 9 pm, on Aug. 11 and Aug. 18. As the holidays draw closer, rehearsals will be held from 7:30 to 9:30 pm, on Tuesdays, Sept. 1, 8, and 15. The Sharyonim will sing during the morning services on Rosh Hashanah on Monday, Sept. 14, and on Yom Kippur on Wednesday, Sept. 23.

Please also note that there are only 6 rehearsals scheduled before Rosh Hashanah, and only one additional rehearsal before Yom Kippur, so please try to attend all the scheduled rehearsals - or as many as possible. If interested in participating with Sharyonim for the High Holy Days this year, send a note to Gail Rose at
grose@tbsohio.org or call the Temple office at (614) 855-4882.

Music at Temple Beth Shalom

At Temple Beth Shalom, we use traditional methods of imbuing our worship services and celebrations with music. Our Music Director, Gail Rose, is a long-time music educator and has been TBS’ Cantorial Soloist since 2008. Gail, along with an accompanist, provides the Cantorial music for Shabbat, High Holy Days, and Lifecycle events. She is accompanied by any number of musicians – Nick Ciranni on guitar or string bass, Marc Rossio on guitar, Scot Ashton or Merry Pruitt on piano, and Cheri Papier on flute, as well as vocalist Connie Hirsh. During Erev Yom Kippur, cellist and TBS member Leon Friedberg is invited to play Kol Nidre.

The earliest synagogue music was based on the same system that was used in the Temple in Jerusalem. Biblical and contemporary sources mention the harp, lyre, Shofar, trumpet, drum, cymbal, bell and flute as instruments that were used in the ancient Temple. According to the Mishna, the regular Temple orchestra consisted of twelve instruments, and the choir of twelve male singers.  A later, now traditional, mode of singing prayers in the synagogue was introduced into Europe in the 7th century, then rapidly developed. This mode is often known as hazzanut, "the art of being a hazzan (cantor),” which requires melodious intonation and vocal agility.*